Diiron trioxide (Fe2O3)

Source of the photo: 
https://echa.europa.eu/hu/registration-dossier/-/registered-dossier/15552
Author of the description: 
Vaszita Emese

CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE DATASHEET

 

CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE IDENTIFICATION

Chemical name                 

Diiron trioxide (Fe2O3) [1]

Synonyms                           

iron oxide red (1309-37-1) [1],

ferric oxide (1309-37-1, 1332-37-2) [1]
Pyrite cinders , hematite (1317-60-8)   [1, 5]

Ferric Oxide Red; Iron (III) Oxide; Iron Sesquioxide; Red Iron Oxide [6]

IUPAC name

diiron(3+) trioxidandiide [1]

CAS No

1309-37-1;

1317-60-8;

1332-37-2  [1, 5]

REACH registration number

 

EC No

215-168-2 

215-275-4 

215-570-8    [1, 5]

Molecular formula              

Fe2O3

Substance group/chemical family

Mono constituent substance/Inorganic

Appearance

Physical state

Odour

Form

Colour

 

solid at 20°C and 1013 hPa

Odourless (100%)

Nanomaterial (50%), Powder (50%) [1]

red-brown, dependent upon size, shape of particles [2]

USES AND HANDLING ISSUES

Relevant identified uses

Industry uses: Pigments, Raw Material Constituent

Consumer uses: Building/construction materials not covered elsewhere, Paints and coatings  [4]

Handling considerations

Wash thoroughly after handling. Remove contaminated clothing and wash before reuse. Use with adequate ventilation. Minimize dust generation and accumulation. Avoid contact with skin and eyes. Keep container tightly closed. Avoid ingestion and inhalation.
Storage:
Store in a tightly closed container. Store in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area away from incompatible substances. [6]

PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

Molecular weight                                  

159.687 g/mol [1]

Bulk density/Specific gravity

5.25 g/cm³ @ 25 °C  [1]

pH

 

Particle size

 

EC

 

Melting point

1 565 °C @ 101.3 kPa  [1]

Boiling point

 

Flash point

 

Flammability

 Noncombustible, except as powder. /Hematite, red/ [4]

Vapour density

 

Vapour pressure

1 mm Hg @ 20C [6]

Solubility in water

insoluble: 1 µg/L @ 20 °C and pH 8  [1]  

soluble in hydrochloric acid, sulphuric acid; slightly soluble in nitric acid [4]

in case of hematite ( Fe2O3): 30 - 70 mg/L @ 20 °C and pH 8 [7]

Solubility in organic solvents

 

Solubility in inorganic solvents

 

Hydrolysis

 

Ionicity in water

 

Surface tension

 

Dispersion properties

 

Explosiveness

 

Index of refraction

3.19, 2.91 [4]

Stability and reactivity

Chemical stability

The product is stable. [1]

Reactivity hazards

Under normal conditions of storage and use, hazardous decomposition products should not be produced. [1]

Corrosivity

 

Polimerization

 

Incompatibility with various substances

Aluminum, bromine pentafluoride, calcium hypochlorite, carbon dioxide, cesium carbide, ethylene oxide, hydrazine, performic acid. [5]

Special remarks on reactivity

Under normal conditions of storage and use, hazardous reactions will not occur. [1]

Physical, chemical and biological coefficient

Koc

 

Kow

 

pKa

 

log Kp

 

Henry-constant

 

ENVIRONMENTAL FATE AND BEHAVIOUR

Artificial pollution sources

 

General terrestrial fate

 

General aquatic fate

 

General atmospheric fate

 

General persistence and degradability

 

Abiotic degradation and metabolites

 

Biodegradation and metabolites

 

Bioconcentration

 

Volatilization

 

Photolysis

 

Hydrolysis

 

Soil adsorption and mobility

 

ENVIRONMENTAL CONCENTRATIONS

Measured data

Hematite is one of the most abundant minerals on Earth's surface and in the shallow crust. It is an iron oxide with a chemical composition of Fe2O3. It is a common rock-forming mineral found in sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks as a primary mineral and as an alteration product. Hematite is the most important ore of iron.

ECOTOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION

General adverse effects on ecosystem

Acute toxicity (LC50, EC50)

Aquatic systems

LC50 ( 5 days) 50 g/L (freshwater fish)

EC50 (48 h) 100 mg/L (aquatic invertebrate)

EC50 (3 h) 10 g/L (microorganisms)  [1]

LC50 (4 days) 410  µg/L (freshwater fish) [7]

EC50 / LC50 320 µg/L (freshwater invertebrates) [7]

EC50 (3 h) 1.9 g/L (microorganisms) [7]

Terrestrial systems

No hazard identified [1]

Chronic toxicity (NOEC, LOEC)

Aquatic systems

NOEC 130 µg/L (freshwater fish) [7]

NOEC 21 mg/L (freshwater invertebrates) [7]

 

Terrestrial systems

NOEC 13 mg/kg food (birds) [7]

HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS and PROTECTION

Routes of human exposures

inhalation, eye, dermal, oral [1]

General effects

 

Endocrine disruption

 

Mutagenicity

 

Carcinogenicity

 

Reprotoxicity

 

Teratogenicity

 

Skin, eye and respiratory irritations

 

Metabolism:

absorption, distribution & excretion

 

Exposure limits

Workers:

DNEL 10 mg/m³ (long term inhalation exposure, repeated dose toxicity) [1]

DNEL 180 µg/m³ (acute short term inhalation exposure) [7]

General population:

DNEL 90 µg/m³ (acute short term inhalation exposure) [7]

DNEL 2.6 µg/kg bw/day (acute long term, eye exposure) [7]

DNEL 610 ng/kg bw/day (acute short term, eye exposure) [7]

US health exposure limits (NIOSH):

PEL(Permissible): TWA 10 mg/m3

REL(Recommended: TWA 5 mg/m3

IDLH (Immediate danger): 2500 mg/m3 [3]

Drinking water MAC

 

Other information

 

Animal toxicity data

Acute toxicity (LD50)

LD50 5 000 - 10 000 mg/kg bw (rat) (oral)

Discriminating conc. (4 h) 5.05 mg/L air (rat) (inhalation) [1]

LD50 14.6 mg/kg bw (rat) (oral exposure) [7]

LC50 (60 min) 2.2 mg/L air (rat) (inhalation) [7]

Chronic toxicity (NOEL, LOEL)

NOAEC 4.7 mg/m³ (subchronic, rat)(inhalation, repeated dose toxicity) [1]

NOAEL: 62.5 ppm (rat) (oral, repeated dose toxicity) [7]

ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS AND REGULATIONS

EINECS regulation

 

OSHA regulations etc.

 

 

 

OTHER INFORMATION, SPECIAL REMARKS

Classification and proposed labelling with regard to toxicological data

According to the classification provided by companies to ECHA in REACH registrations this substance is toxic to aquatic life with long lasting effects.

Additionally, the classification provided by companies to ECHA in CLP notifications identifies that this substance causes serious eye irritation, causes skin irritation and may cause respiratory irritation.

 

 

CREATED, LAST UPDATE

Created

2019. 04. 16

Last update

2019. 04. 17

REFERENCES

[1] ECHA, European Chemical Agency, Diiron Trioxide, https://echa.europa.eu/hu/brief-profile/-/briefprofile/100.013.790, https://echa.europa.eu/hu/registration-dossier/-/registered-dossier/15552/1, Accessed 2019.04.16

[2] Toxnet, HSDB, Ferric oxide, https://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search/a?dbs+hsdb:@term+@DOCNO+452,  Accessed 2019.04.16

[3] NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards. Iron oxide dust and fume (as Fe), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg/npgd0344.html, Accessed 2019.04.16

[4] PubChem, Hematite https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/hematite#section=Melting-Point,  Accessed 2019.04.16

[5] CHembk , CAS database, Ferric oxide, https://www.chembk.com/en/chem/diiron%20trioxide, Accessed 2019.04.17

[6] Molbase, Compound Encyclopedia, ferric oxide 1309-37-1 MSDS http://www.molbase.com/en/msds_1309-37-1-moldata-1543870.html#tabs, Accessed 2019.04.17

[7] ECHA, European Chemical Agency, Hematite, https://echa.europa.eu/hu/brief-profile/-/briefprofile/100.013.888, Accessed 2019.04.17